Culture dating personals society

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As Traister points out, their emergence demands a massive rethink of social policies around work, end-of-life care, euthanasia, and definition of family, to name just a few issues.Yet that rethink seems nowhere in sight, and narratives of single female life seem positively stuck.

As Traister points out, their emergence demands a massive rethink of social policies around work, end-of-life care, euthanasia, and definition of family, to name just a few issues.Yet that rethink seems nowhere in sight, and narratives of single female life seem positively stuck.

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“Members of 18th- and 19th-century bourgeoisie societies couldn’t marry until they achieved a certain financial bracket,” she said, which meant as many as 25 per cent didn’t marry.The accompanying story, excerpted from the upcoming book by Rebecca Traister, explores the latest superpower (and validator) of single women: their role as electoral king- (or queen-) makers.Single women’s support paved the way for Obama’s win in 2008, writes Traister, a staff writer at the magazine; married women voted for Romney.It was a generation ago, in the early 1990s, Traister reminds us, that the popular TV show portrayed a post-40-year-old, affluent, divorced woman who—eventually—raised a child alone.The fictional character was such a social outlier that an inflamed U. vice-president Dan Quayle blamed her for the “family breakdown” that gave rise to the Los Angeles riots.The difference today, says the author of , is that it’s now easy to be single: “You don’t need a strong hands to cut a tree down for kindling.” In fact, single women’s thriving agency and activism as early as the 19th century was the topic of Betsy Israel’s underappreciated 2002 book as she ties together seemingly disparate threads accounting for the rise of single females, from the support given single women by city life (“Girlhattan”), to the intimacy offered by female friendships (the male “soulmate” is being replaced by platonic friendship in the vein of Christina and Meredith friendship of to how “hook-up culture” is employed by women to avoid relationships that might divert focus from education.But the rumblings of this modern iteration of female singlehood date all the way back to 1960: Three years before the publication of Betty Friedan’s actors under the headline “Who needs a husband?The fact unmarried women, young and old, tend to vote progressively—for federally mandated maternity leave, reproductive rights and equal-pay protections—is a determining factor in the U. presidential primaries, Traister notes, with Millennial female support currently buttressing Bernie Sanders.The voting clout of unmarried women is only one theme of , a wide-ranging examination of singledom that has garnered predictable media buzz ahead of its March 1 publication.In the ensuing years, mainstream portrayals of unmarried women became less nuanced, younger and more neurotic—see Ally Mc Beal and Bridget Jones—even as the demographic’s economic clout was celebrated and cultivated.The landmark 2000 study “The Single Female Consumer,” produced by the U. arm of advertising giant Young & Rubicam, claimed that professional, educated single women living alone were “new yuppies,” the biggest consumer group in the world.

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